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Meet the amateurs at the U.S. Women's Open
24 May 2022
by Jim Young of AmateurGolf.com

see also: U.S. Women's Open Championship, Pine Needles Lodge and Golf Club, Rose Zhang Rankings

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Rose Zhang (USGA photo)
Rose Zhang (USGA photo)

A total of 31 amateur players will make their way to Southern Pines, NC to participate in the 77th U.S. Women’s Open Championship, which gets underway on Thursday at the Pine Needles Resort & Golf Club.


Rose Zhang
Leading the amateur contingent is Rose Zhang, the top-ranked female amateur in the world (WAGR). The 2022 ANNIKA Award winner as the top collegiate player in women's golf won four events during her freshman season at Stanford, including the NCAA Championship individual title. The native of Irvine, Calif. will be making her fourth start in the U.S. Women's Open, where her best finish was a tie for 55th in her debut at the Country Club of Charleston in 2019.

Ingrid Lindblad, who just wrapped up her junior season at LSU, is currently ranked second behind Zhang WAGR. Her inaugural U.S. Women's Open appearance comes on the heels of a five-win season at LSU.

Anna Davis, the ultra-chill bucket hat-wearing lefthander from Spring Valley, Calif. will be making her first U.S. Open by virtue of winning the Augusta National Women's Amateur in April. Interesting to note Davis shares a birthday with nine-time USGA champion Bobby Jones (March 17).

Jensen Castle will be making her second U.S. Women's Open appearance, but this time as a USGA champion. The native of West Columbia, SC became the first 63rd seed to ever win the U.S. Women's Amateur Championship last year at Westchester Country Club.

At 15 years, 6 months and 2 weeks of age as of June 2, amateur Jeonghyun Lee of the Republic of China is the championship’s youngest competitor.

Catherine Lacoste, the daughter of French tennis player Rene Lacoste and 1927 British Ladies Amateur champion Simone Thion de la Chaume, remains the only amateur ever to win the U.S. Women's Open, a feat she accomplished in 1967 at the Virginia Hot Springs Country Club. However, seven other amateurs have finished runner-up, mostly recently Hye-Jin Choi in 2017.

Will one of these 32 amateurs make history of their own come Sunday?

Here's a look at the amateur players who will be competing in the 77th U.S. Women’s Open Championship at Pine Needles.

• • • • •

Meet the Amateurs

Saki Baba (Japan)
Celebrated her 17th birthday in style by qualifying for her first U.S. Women's Open. Baba carded rounds of 69-70 on the East and West Courses of Boso Country Club in Chiba Prefecture, Japan on April 25. In 2021, she finished sixth in the Kanto Women's Amateur and seventh in the Kanto Junior Championship. She was 14th in the 2021 Japan Junior Championship.

Malak Bouraeda (Morocco)
The 21-year-old will make her first U.S. Women's Open start after earning the lone spot at Walnut Creek Golf Preserve, shooting 1-under-par 143 (71-72) in the 36-hole qualifier. Just completed her senior season at Colorado, but is planning to return for a Super Senior season in 2022-23 while pursuing a masters degree. She graduated in May with a degree in strategic communications. Even though she was born in St. Louis, Mo., and raised in Southlake, Texas, Bouraeda represents Morocco in competitions. Her father was born in Morocco, so she has dual citizenship. She will be the first to represent the country in the U.S. Women's Open. Boureada lost her mother to a long battle with Crohn's disease when she was 10 years old, and that's when the family relocated to Texas. Ever since the loss, Malak dedicated herself to becoming a Division I golfer, which she accomplished with the scholarship to Colorado. Last year, she advanced to the NCAA Baton Rouge, La., regional as an individual, but the event was eventually canceled due to heavy rains and unplayable course conditions. She has posted three top-5 finishes for the Buffaloes over the past four seasons.

Blakelsy Brock (Chattanooga, Tenn.)
The 26-year-old earned her first U.S. Women's Open start by capturing the 2021 U.S. Women's Mid-Amateur at Berkeley Hall in Bluffton, S.C. Brock, a former University of Tennessee player, defeated 64 seed Aliea Clark, 5 and 4, in the 18-hole final. At 25 years, 10 months, 20 days, she became the third-youngest champion in U.S. Women's Mid-Amateur history. The victory came on the heels of her claiming the 2021 Tennessee Women's Mid-Amateur title. She also won a pair of Tennessee Girls' Junior championships. Attended the same high school in Chattanooga (Baylor School) as current PGA Tour players Harris English, Keith Mitchell and Luke List.

Jensen Castle (Columbia, S.C.)

Jensen Castle
The Columbia, S.C., native produced one of the most Cinderella runs to a USGA championship since the Association began seeding players from stroke play in the mid-1980s. Castle survived a 12-for-2 playoff at Westchester Country Club to earn a spot in the match-play draw at the 121st U.S. Women's Amateur and then proceeded to become just the third No. 63 seed to win a USGA title, and the first female to achieve the feat. The University of Kentucky standout defeated University of Arizona All-American Yu-Chiang (Vivian) Hou, of Chinese Taipei, 2 and 1, in the 36-hole championship match. The victory also earned Castle a spot on the 2021 USA Curtis Cup Team, which retained the Cup at Conwy Golf Club a couple of weeks after the Women's Amateur final. Castle also will represent the USA in this year's Curtis Cup at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa., a week after the Women's Open. This will be Castle's second consecutive U.S. Women's Open start after missing the cut last year at The Olympic Club. In 2019, Castle finished runner-up to reigning U.S. Women's Open champion Yuka Saso at the PGA Girls' Junior Championship.

Kylee Choi (Murrieta, Calif.)
The 15-year-old from Murrieta, Calif., claimed the only spot at Meridian Country Club, posting rounds of 74-71 to earn medalist honors by one stroke. Choi, who advanced to match play in the 2021 U.S. Girls' Junior, has already won a pair of professional tournaments in Arizona on the developmental Cactus Tour, including The Wigwam-Heritage at age 14 in December 20. In April 2021, she won a Cactus Tour event at Longbow Golf Club. Earlier this year, she shared runner-up honors at the Kathy Whitworth Invitational and was fourth in the Ping Heather Farr Classic, both on the American Junior Golf Association circuit. She also tied for 10th in the 2021 Rolex Girls Junior Championship.

Anna Davis (Spring Valley, Calif.)

Anna Davis
Davis carded a final-round, 3-under-par 69 to win the 2022 Augusta National Women's Amateur by one stroke over LSU standouts Ingrid Lindblad and Latanna Stone. The left-hander also captured the 2021 PGA Girls' Junior Championship by seven strokes at Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Ky., earning a spot on the USA Junior Ryder Cup Team. The competition, however, was not staged due to COVID-19. She also represented the USA in the Junior Solheim Cup. The Spring Valley, Calif., resident's first big win of 2021 came in the Heather Farr Classic in Arizona. Last July, Davis qualified for match play in the U.S. Girls' Junior, losing in the Round of 64 to past Drive, Chip and Putt national champion and fellow Southern Californian Kelly Xu. She also advanced to the quarterfinals of the 2021 U.S. Women's Amateur Four-Ball Championship with partner Lucy Yuan, losing to eventual runners-up Jillian Bourdage and Casey Weidenfeld. Davis has a twin brother, Billy, who also is a competitive golfer, and the two share the same birthday as nine-time USGA champion Bob Jones (March 17).

Bailey Davis (White Plains, Md.)
Davis, who just completed her freshman season at the University of Tennessee, will make her U.S. Women’s Open debut after topping the field at Belle Haven Country Club. The White Plains, Md., resident posted a 36-hole total of 3-under-par 141 (70-71) to garner one of the two available spots. Davis and LPGA Tour veteran Sarah Kemp were the only golfers to break par. Last July, Davis became just the second Black golfer to advance to a U.S. Girls' Junior final (Lakarabe Abe) before losing to World No. 1 Rose Zhang at Columbia Country Club in Chevy Chase, Md., not far from her residence. She also was the runner-up to 2022 USA Curtis Cup competitor Amari Avery in the 2021 Mack Invitational in Texas. Davis won the 2020 Maryland State Girls Amateur and was a 3-time Maryland 4A high school champion. This past season at Tennessee, she posted one top 10 in 10 tournaments.

Louise Duncan (Scotland)

Louise Duncan
Duncan played her way into her first U.S. Women's Open start by capturing The Women's Amateur Championship at Kilmarnock in Troon, Scotland last summer. Duncan ended a 24-year-old drought for Scottish golfers in the world's oldest women's amateur competition. In the 36-hole final, Duncan posted a 9-and-8 win over JoHanna Lea Luoviksdottir, of Iceland. Duncan carried her fine play into the AIG Women's British Open at Carnoustie by tying for ninth to earn low--amateur honors at 7-under-par 281. Duncan represented Great Britain and Ireland in the 2021 Curtis Cup Match at Conwy in Wales. She has represented Scotland in the Home Internationals and European Girls Championship. Duncan also is an R&A Scholar majoring in sports studies.

Alexandra Forsterling (Germany)
The Arizona State University standout will make her U.S. Women's Open debut after shooting 2-under 142 (72-70) to share medalist honors at the Gainey Ranch Golf Club qualifier in Scottsdale, Ariz., on April 26. A member of the German National Team, Forsterling won the 2014 European Young Masters and was the runner-up in the 2021 European Ladies Amateur. Before enrolling at ASU, she was a member of the 2014 European Junior Ryder Cup Team. She also won the 2021 German International Amateur. Owns one college victory when she shared the title with Sun Devil teammate Linn Grant in the 2021 Match in the Desert. She picked up her second collegiate victory in March at the PING/ASU Invitational also competed in the 2021 Augusta National Women's Amateur.

Laney Frye (Nicholasville, Ky.)
Frye, a sophomore at the University of Kentucky from Nicholasville, Ky., qualified for her first U.S. Women’s Open via a 2-for-1 playoff against LPGA Tour player Sanna Luutinen at Shannopin Country Club. Frye posted a 36-hole total of even-par 142 (70-72). Two weeks earlier, Frye and fellow Kentucky teammate Maria Villanueva advanced to the quarterfinals of the U.S. Women's Amateur Four-Ball in Puerto Rico, losing, 1 down, to eventual champions Thienna Huynh and Sara Im. Frye will join Kentucky teammate and reigning U.S. Women's Amateur champion Jensen Castle in the field at Pine Needles. She also qualified for the 2019 U.S. Girls' Junior and 2021 U.S. Women's Amateur.

Annabell Fuller (England)

Annabell Fuller
The University of Florida junior is set to make her U.S. Women's Open debut after shooting 3-under-par 137 at Mark Bostic Golf Course at the University of Florida, her home collegiate venue. Fuller will play this championship just prior to representing Great Britain and Ireland in a third consecutive Curtis Cup at Merion Golf Club after competing for the side in 2018 and 2021. Fuller went 3-2-0 in the COVID-19-delayed Curtis Cup last August in Wales, and she is the first GB&I player to play in three Curtis Cups since current LPGA Tour winner Leona Maguire achieved the feat (2010, 2012, 2016). Last summer, she tied for 61st in the 2021 AIG Women's Open at Carnoustie after getting into the field as a last-minute alternate, and was one of three amateurs to make the 36-hole cut. Fuller won the 2020 English Women's Open Amateur Stroke Play Championship, and was the runner-up to Aline Krauter, of Germany in the 2020 Women's Amateur Championship at West Lancashire Golf Club in England. She was a member of the victorious England team at the 2021 European Ladies' Team Championship and Home Internationals. She also represented Europe in the Junior Solheim Cup prior to enrolling at Florida.

Ami Gianchandani (Watchung, NJ)
The Watchung, N.J., resident earned a spot in her first U.S. Women's Open by shooting even-par 140 (71-69) at Worcester Country Club. In 2019, she became the first player from Yale to earn Ivy League Player of the Year and Freshman of the Year honors. She was the fourth Bulldog in history to win the Player of the Year honor. She tied for third in this year's Ivy League Championship. The junior has registered four collegiate victories. The Ivy League did not compete in the 2020-21 campaign due to COVID-19. Advanced to the quarterfinals of the 2017 U.S. Girls' Junior at Boone Valley Golf Club in Augusta, Mo., losing 1 down to Elizabeth Moon. Represented New Jersey in the 2015 USGA Women's State Team Championship and qualified for the U.S. Women's Amateur in 2019 and 2020.

Lauren Gomez (Murietta, Calif.)
The Murrieta, Calif., resident qualified for her first U.S. Women's Open by shooting 8-under-par 136 (68-68) at Soule Park Golf Course in Ojai, Calif., to earn medalist honors. The Pepperdine University freshman accomplished this feat a week after winning the West Coast Conference title at Reflection Bay Golf Club in Henderson, Nev., for her first collegiate victory. Qualified for the 2021 U.S. Women's Amateur. Gomez also reached the Round of 16 of the 2018 and 2019 U.S. Women's Amateur Four-Ball with partner Olivia Yun. Also qualified for match play in the 2018 U.S. Girls' Junior and advanced to the semifinals of the 2020 California Women's Amateur. Also was named the 2017 San Diego Junior Golf Association Player of the Year.

Melanie Green (Medina, NY)
Green, who just completed her sophomore season at the University of South Florida, qualified for her first U.S. Women's Open by shooting 6-under-par 138 (68-70) at The Forest Country Club's Bear Course. In 10 events this season, the Medina, N.Y., native posted seven top-10s, including a victory that she shared at the Trinity Forest Invitational. She finished sxith in the American Conference Championship. In 2019, Green qualified for the U.S. Women's Amateur at Old Waverly Golf Club., and she competed in the 2018 U.S. Girls' Junior at Poppy Hills.

Natsumi Hayakawa (Japan)
Hayakawa, who just recently turned professional, earned her first U.S. Women's Open start by registering rounds of 67-69 on the East and West Courses of Boso Country Club in the Chiba Prefecture, Japan, qualifier on April 25. She survived a 4-for-3 playoff for the last available spots. As an amateur, she won the Girls Under-16 Division of the Faldo Series Japan Championship in 2018.

Sara Im (Duluth, Ga.)

Sara Im
Two weeks after capturing the U.S. Women's Amateur Four-Ball title in Puerto Rico with partner Thienna Huynh, Im shot 5-under-par 139 to garner the second and final qualifying spot at Dunwood Country Club to earn her first U.S. Women's Open start. Im has committed to play for Vanderbilt University in the fall of 2023. The highly decorated junior golfer represented the USA in the 2021 Junior Solheim Cup contested last September in Ohio. In 2018, Im was the Girls 12-13 division of the Drive, Chip & Putt National Finals at Augusta National Golf Club. She also owns six American Junior Golf Association victories and was the 2020 Georgia Women's Amateur champion, defeating her four-ball partner Huynh in a seven-hole playoff. She also helped Lambert High win the 2021 National High School Championship in Pinehurst, N.C.

Nika Ito (Japan)
The teenager will compete in her first U.S. Women's Open after posting rounds of 71-68 on the East and West Courses of Boso Country Club in Chiba Prefecture, Japan on April 25.

Alicia Joo (Republic of Korea)
The 18-year-old amateur will make her U.S. Women's Open debut after earning one of the two available spots at Dream Park Country Club (Dream Course) on April 22. She posted a 36-hole total of 138. Joo is a dual ciitzen of Korea and the United States, as she was born in Los Angeles before moving to Korea when she was 9. In 2021, she was the third-ranked player in the Korea Junior Golf Association, winning the Jeollanam-do Championship last August, and finishing third in the Gyeongsangnam-do Championship. She also was sixth in the Lecaf Championship. Joo also has competed in four Toyota Tour Cup events in Southern California as part of the SCPGA Tour, finishing second at an event in Fallbrook. She is currently hoping to play college golf in the United States.

Karissa Kilby (Honolulu, Haw.)
Kilby will make her U.S. Women's Open debut after getting into the field as the first alternate from the Honolulu, Hawaii, qualifying site. Kilby just completed her freshman season at Florida International University. She finished eighth in this year's Conference USA Championship and was fourth in the 2021 Hawaii State Women's Amateur. Kilby attended the same high school as President Barack Obama and Michelle Wie West (Punahou School).

Lauren Kim (Canada)
The first alternate from the Kent, Wash., qualifier will make her first U.S. Women's Open start. The Surrey, British Columbia native is a rising high school senior who has committed to attend the University of Texas in 2023. Kim won three American Junior Golf Association tournaments last year and tied for fifth in the 2022 Junior Orange Bowl in Miami.

Minsol Kim (Republic of Korea)
Kim landed a spot in the U.S. Women's Open field as the first alternate from the Incheon, Korea, qualifier, winning a playoff against fellow amateur Youmin Hwang. She will celebrate her 16th birthday 11 days after the U.S. Women's Open concludes on June 5. This will be her first start in the championship. She is currently the No. 237 player in the Women's World Amateur Golf Ranking. She recently finished fourth in the Korea Golf Association President Cup Women's Amateur Golf Championship.

Jeonghyun Lee (Republic of South Korea)
Lee became the second 15-year-old to qualify for the U.S. Women's Open, joining Southern Californian Kylee Choi, who had qualified a couple of days earlier. She earned her first U.S. Women's Open berth by shooting 139 to garner the second and final spot at Dream Park Country Club (Dream Course) in the Republic of Korea. She is currently inside the top 30 of the Women's World Amateur Golf Ranking. At the age of 12, she made headlines when she took home team and individual gold medals for Korea at the Spirit International in Texas. At age 8, she relocated from Korea to New Zealand to follow the blueprint of former world No. 1 Lydia Ko. In 2020, she won the New Zealand Stroke Play Championship and the Korean Women's Amateur.

Ingrid Lindblad (Sweden)

Ingrid Lindblad
Lindblad, who tied for 30th in 2020 at Champions Golf Club, will make her second U.S. Women’s Open start after being added to the field as a first alternate from the Hockley, Texas, site. She currently is the No. 2 player in the Women’s World Amateur Golf Ranking® behind Rose Zhang. A junior at Louisiana State, Lindblad finished tied for second with LSU teammate Latanna Stone in the 2022 Augusta National Women's Amateur. As a freshman, she was the Southeastern Conference's Player of the Year and Freshman of the Year, becoming the first Tiger to achieve the feat. Her scoring average that season was a program-best 70.33. Last summer, she won the European Ladies Amateur by three strokes over Alexandra Forsterling, who also qualified for this year's U.S. Women's Open, while capturing a pair of victories on the Nordic Tour, a developmental professional circuit in Europe. In 2019, Lindblad led Sweden to the 2019 European Ladies’ Team Championship. This spring, she holed a 38-foot eagle putt on the final hole to win the SEC individual title and helped the Tigers to its first team championship in 30 years by going 2-0-1 in three matches.

Emma McMyler (San Antonio, Texas)
The San Antonio, Texas, native and Xavier University standout qualified for her first U.S. Women's Open after shooting 3-under-par 141 (69-72) on Ohio State University's Scarlet Course. McMyler, a sophomore, was named the Big East Conference's Player of the Year after sharing medalist honors in the conference championship. It was her second victory of the 2021-22 season. McMyler advanced to the Round of 16 of the 2021 U.S. Women's Amateur before losing to eventual runner-up Vivian Hou. In January, McMyler won the South Atlantic Amateur (The Sally) and she also competed in the 2019 U.S. Girls' Junior.

Lauren Miller (Niceville, Fla.)
The Niceville, Fla., resident will make her U.S. Women's Open debut after shooting 2-under-par 142 (71-71) at Fox Run Golf Club. Miller, a graduate student at Mississippi State, was a two-time Women's Golf Coaches Association Academic All-American who earned her degree in sports administration. She posted one top-10 finish in six events during the 2021-22 campaign. She was coached at MSU by Charlie Ewing, the husband of LPGA Tour winner Ally Ewing, who is in this year's U.S. Women's Open field.

Anna Morgan (Spartanburg, S.C.)
Morgan is set to make her U.S. Women's Open debut after qualifying at Mid Pines Inn & Resort in a 5-for-2 playoff for the final spots. She finished the 36-hole qualifier at even-par 144 (71-73). The Furman junior led the Paladins to the 2022 Southern Conference title with her tie for ninth. She was medalist in two other college tournaments in 2021-22: the Lady Paladin Invitational and UNF Collegiate. Morgan was named the 2020-21 Southern Conference Player of the Year and advanced to the Round of 32 of the 2021 U.S. Women's Amateur. In 2020, she won her second consecutive South Carolina Women's Amateur title.

Bohyun Park (Republic of Korea)
The Republic of Korea native who now resides in Farmers Branch, Texas, earned her second consecutive U.S. Women's Open start after being the first alternate in the Richardson, Texas, qualifier held at Canyon Creek Country Club, shooting a 36-hole total of 137. Park just completed her freshman season for the University of Texas, posting three top-five finishes and a stroke average of 72.57. Prior to enrolling at Texas, Park was the runner-up in the 2021 Rolex Girls Junior Championship. She also advanced to the Round of 32 in the 2020 U.S. Women’s Amateur. In 2019, she qualified for match play at the U.S. Girls’ Junior.

Catherine Park (Irvine, Calif.)
Park will make her U.S. Women's Open debut after sharing medalist honors at Pauma Valley (Calif.) Country Club with professional Alyaa Abdulghany. The two posted a 36-hole total of 4-under-par 138, with Park shooting 67-71. Park has signed to play at the University of Southern California this fall, the same school that produced Abdulghany. Park will join fellow Trojans Lizette Salas, Sophia Popov, Tiffany Chan, Annie Park and Gabriela Ruffels in the field. Park comes from a highly athletic family. Her mom, Hyang-Soo Seo, was the first female from the Republic of Korea to win an Olympic gold medal, achieving the feat in archery during the 1984 Games in Los Angeles. Her father, Kyung-Ho Park, was a gold medalist in the 1986 Asian Games in judo. Her older brother, Sean, played professional baseball in Korea, and her older sister, Victoria, played professionally on the Symetra Tour (now Epson Tour). She was a quarterfinalist in the 2010 U.S. Women's Amateur Public Links, losing to eventual winner Emily Tubert. Catherine shares the same instructor (George Pinnell) as 2020 U.S. Women's Amateur and 2021 U.S. Girls' Junior champion Rose Zhang, who is in the U.S. Women's Open field. Park won the 2019 Se Ri Pak Junior on the American Junior Golf Association circuit. She tied for sixth in the 2021 Rolex Girlsl Junior Championship.

Bailey Shoemaker (Dade City, Fla.)

Bailey Shoemaker
Two weeks after finishing as the runner-up (with partner Kaitlyn Schroeder) in the U.S. Women's Amateur Four-Ball Championship in Puerto Rico, Shoemaker qualified for her first U.S. Women's Open by earning medalist honors at Willoughby Golf Club in Stuart, Fla. Shoemaker posted a 36-hole total of 1-under-par 143 (68-75). Shoemaker is committed to play for the University of Southern California in 2023. Last summer, she advanced to the quarterfinals of the U.S. Girls' Junior. She also earned a sponsor's invite to the LPGA Tour's Volunteers of America in Texas, she missed the cut. Shoemaker represented the USA in the 2021 Junior Solheim Cup contested at Sylvania Country Club in Ohio. She is a three-time New York State Girls Junior champion and has twice earned low-amateur honors in the Florida Women's Open. Although she was born in Florida, she was raised in the small upstate New York town of West Edmeston.

Rose Zhang (Irvine, Calif.)
The 2022 ANNIKA Award winner as the top female player in collegiate golf, Zhang has been the undisputed No. 1 player in the Women's World Amateur Golf Ranking since her triumph over Gabriela Ruffels in the 2020 U.S. Women's Amateur. Last summer, Zhang won the U.S. Girls' Junior to become the eighth player to have won both the U.S. Women's Amateur and U.S. Girls' Junior titles, but the first to capture the latter second. She also received the McCormack Medal as the No. 1 player in the WAGR for a second consecutive season. Just completed her freshman season at Stanford University, where she won four tournaments, including the NCAA individual title. Zhang went 4-0-1 for the USA in the 2021 Curtis Cup Match at Conwy Golf Club in Wales in the 12.5-7.5 victory to retain the Cup. In 2019, Zhang helped the USA win a mixed team gold medal in the Pan American Games in Lima, Peru. This will be Zhang’s fourth U.S. Women’s Open start.

Yunxuang Zhang (People’s Republic of China)
Zhang will make her first U.S. Women's Open start after shooting 10-under-par 134 (67-67)to earn medalist honors in the Richardson, Texas, qualifier at Canyon Lake Country Club. Advanced to the Round of 32 of the 2021 U.S. Girls' Junior before losing to 2021 U.S. Women's Open qualifier Karoline Tuttle. Has signed to play for Southern Methodist University, beginning this fall. Born in China, but now resides in Plano, Texas. Tied for fifth in the 2022 Kathy Whitworth Invitational and Hilton Gardens Vacation Annika Invitational, both events on the American Junior Golf Association circuit. Tied for sixth in the 2021 Rolex Girls Junior Championship.

• • • • •

Amateur Angles

U.S. Women’s Amateur champions (5)
Jensen Castle (2021), Danielle Kang (2010, 2011), Lydia Ko (2012), Gabriela Ruffels (2019), Rose Zhang (2020)

U.S. Women’s Amateur runners-up (6)
Brooke Henderson (2014), Jaye Marie Green (2012), Moriya Jutanugarn (2011), Jessica Korda (2010), Gabriela Ruffels (2020), Annika Sorenstam (1992)

U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur champions (1)
Blakesly Brock (2021)

U.S. Girls’ Junior champions (8)
Ariya Jutanugarn (2011), In-Kyung Kim (2005), Minjee Lee (2012), Yealimi Noh (2018), Amy Olson (2009), Jenny Shin (2006), Lexi Thompson (2008), Rose Zhang (2021)

U.S. Girls’ Junior runners-up (6)
Dottie Ardina (2011), Bailey Davis (2021), Alison Lee (2012), Andrea Lee (2016), Alexa Pano (2018), Angel Yin (2015)
U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball champions (1)
Sara Im (2022)

USA Curtis Cup Team members (20)
Jensen Castle (2021, 2022), Allisen Corpuz (2021), Ally Ewing (2014), Mariel Galdiano (2016, 2018), Mina Harigae (2008), Jessica Korda (2010), Jennifer Kupcho (2018), Brittany Lang (2004), Alison Lee (2014), Andrea Lee (2016, 2018), Stacy Lewis (2008), Lucy Li (2018), Amy Olson (2012), Annie Park (2014), Angela Stanford (2000), Lexi Thompson (2010), Lilia Vu (2018), Michelle Wie West (2004), Bethany Wu (2016), Rose Zhang (2021, 2022)

GB&I Curtis Cup Team members (9)
Gemma Dryburgh (2014), Louise Duncan (2021, 2022), Annabell Fuller (2018, 2021, 2022), Georgia Hall (2014), Charley Hull (2012), Bronte Law (2012, 2014, 2016), Leona Maguire (2010, 2012, 2016), Stephanie Meadow (2012, 2014), Mel Reid (2006)

NCAA Division I champions (4)
Jennifer Kupcho (2018, Wake Forest), Stacy Lewis (2007, Arkansas), Annie Park (2013, USC), Rose Zhang (2022, Stanford)

Top-Ranked Amateur Players in the Field
No. 1 – Rose Zhang
No. 2 – Ingrid Lindblad
No. 13 – Alexandra Forsterling
No. 23 – Anna Davis
No. 32 – Bohyun Park
No. 48 – Annabell Fuller

based on WAGR as of May 25

LPGA-USGA Girls Golf Alums in Field (11)
Jensen Castle (a)
Bailey Davis (a)
Amanda Doherty
Laney Frye (a)
Melanie Green (a)
Sara Im (a)
Lauren Kim
Alison Lee
Anna Morgan (a)
Yealimi Noh
Bailey Shoemaker (a)

The USGA contributed to this report

ABOUT THE U.S. Women's Open

The U.S. Women's Open is the biggest tournament in women's golf and one of 14 national championships conducted by the USGA. The event is open to any female who has a USGA Handicap Index not exceeding 4.4.

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