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Men's World Amateur Team: No. 1 Ranked Amateur Webb Simpson

WINSTON-SALEM, North Carolina (Oct 19, 2006) -- Wake Forest junior golfer Webb Simpson, who was scheduled to represent the United States later this month at the World Amateur Team Championship in South Africa, broke a bone in his hand earlier this week and will be out of action the remainder of the fall.

Simpson, a two-time All-ACC performer, is seeing a hand specialist today. He was scheduled to join the rest of the United States team later this week to fly to Stellnbosch, South Africa, site of the World Amateur Team Championship. Some 75 teams from around the world will compete Oct. 26-29 for the Eisenhower Trophy.

Simpson will be replaced on the team by Georgia's Chris Kirk.

A second team All-American in 2006, Simpson jumped at the opportunity to join the USA team, calling it a "once in a lifetime opportunity." In fact, so concerned about missing class time associated with the trip, he turned down a chance to join his Wake Forest teammates earlier this fall in a trip to Scotland.

Simpson is considered one of the top amateur players in the country. He was ranked No. 1 among all amateurs earlier this year. This past summer he advanced all the way to the semifinals of the U.S. Amateur. He played last week with the Deacons at the Bank of Tennessee Intercollegiate in Jonesborough, Tenn.

The Wake Forest golf team will compete this weekend at the Isleworth Invitational in Orlando, Fla.

* story courtesy Wake Forest Univ. Athletic Dept. *

ABOUT THE Men's World Amateur Team

In 1958 the United States Golf Association asked The R&A to join them in sponsoring a world-wide amateur golf team event to be played biennially in non-Walker Cup years. Between 35 and 40 nations were represented at the first meeting and President Dwight D. Eisenhower presented the trophy which bears his name. The committee of the event was to be known as the World Amateur Golf Council and is now the International Golf Federation. Teams of four players from each country competed over 72 holes with the leading three scores from each round to count. The first competition was held between 29 nations at St Andrews, with Australia beating the United States in a play-off. In 2002 the format changed to teams of three with the two leading scores to count.

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